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Latest Activity

Randy Klepinger replied to Stacie L. Herman-Laurence's discussion Replacing a 1909 front walk
"It is a washed aggregate. Good cement contractors can do this."
7 hours ago
Randy Klepinger replied to Randall Coleman's discussion best metal to enclose my roof line
"I'm sorry. You didn't give enough detail to give an answer. Photos are helpful"
7 hours ago
Randall Coleman posted a discussion

best metal to enclose my roof line

I am enclosing my roof line. What metal do you think I should use?
22 hours ago
James Hartman replied to James Hartman's discussion Interior Door Oiling
"Thanks.  I will enjoy some quality time with a video tonight."
yesterday
caseypratt replied to James Hartman's discussion Interior Door Oiling
"You can use just shellac alone. Don't use stain unless you really want to darken or change the color. You can't lighten by staining, obvs. You do not need a pre-stain conditioner for shellac. The mineral oil treatment is good because the…"
yesterday
Vinnie Marlette posted photos
Friday
Brad H posted photos
Thursday
James Olson posted a discussion

OHJ April 2015 Issue

Walking up the driveway, with my bundle of mail cozily wrapped in the April 2015 issue of OHJ, something felt different.  Laying the magazine flat I thought I saw it but I couldn't be sure.  Beau pulled on his leash to sniff something in the snow…See More
Thursday

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Old House Forum

Replacing a 1909 front walk 4 Replies

HI all,its been 6 years since I posted here and now I am looking to replace our 1909 front walk.  I have been babying it for several years because I don't want a new looking concrete walkway. Does anyone have suggestions on how to recreate that heavy aggregate aged look without using dyes or stains?  I love the look of our walkway but its just falling apart now and I have to do something for safety's sake.  Photos of the entire walk and a close up of the texture that I really love and want to…Continue

Started by Stacie L. Herman-Laurence in Old House How-To. Last reply by Randy Klepinger 7 hours ago.

best metal to enclose my roof line 1 Reply

I am enclosing my roof line. What metal do you think I should use?

Started by Randall Coleman in Old Houses: 1900-1945. Last reply by Randy Klepinger 7 hours ago.

Interior Door Oiling 10 Replies

I have some excellent interior doors in the 1856 home I just bought out of foreclosure. No paint on them at all. The wood is dry as a bone. I am torn on what to do. Just oil them, or oil and poly? If just oil, what type? Tung? hemp? lemon?Also need to treat my gorgeous, original walnut bannister and kneul post.Any advice appreciated.Continue

Started by James Hartman in Old Houses: Pre-1900. Last reply by James Hartman yesterday.

OHJ April 2015 Issue

Walking up the driveway, with my bundle of mail cozily wrapped in the April 2015 issue of OHJ, something felt different.  Laying the magazine flat I thought I saw it but I couldn't be sure.  Beau pulled on his leash to sniff something in the snow and my attention diverted to him. Later I would figure it out.Yep, it's narrower (by 1cm) and 15 pp. thinner.  I can live with that, this time.  But the real surprise wasn't noticed for a few days.  The shape of the text layout on the masthead looked…Continue

Started by James Olson in The Old-House Attic on Thursday.

Aluminum windows and siding? 14 Replies

I just purchased a 1894 Folk Victorian (I believe) in a tiny little town in Eastern Oregon.  I did not set out to own an historic home!  I fell in love with this house when I first moved to the area 5 years ago and when it came on the market I jumped at the chance to own it.  I bought it because it looked like home, like a place to finish raising my kids, and then a place for the grandkids to come on weekends, summers and holidays.  After moving in, I kept discovering all the amazing things in…Continue

Started by Jennifer Garinger in Old Houses: Pre-1900. Last reply by James Olson on Wednesday.

Double hung, help with center stop? 9 Replies

Hi,So, after researching and drinking a lot of coffee for confidence, I finally decided to try and remove the upper sash of one of my 28 double hung 1891 windows.  The lower sash had been working, but I have wanted to completely rennovate this window, and get the upper sash working as well.  It's in a 2nd story laundry that we converted from an old bathroom, and I think it would be nice to have the ability to vent from above.  About 1/3 of my windows open, but only from the bottom.  They have…Continue

Started by Kari Dunn in Old Houses: Pre-1900. Last reply by Randy Klepinger on Wednesday.

painting over plaster on exterior walls 3 Replies

We have plaster walls in our 1929 home. Most of the interior walls are wooden lath under 3 coat plaster, but the exterior walls are plastered directly on the brick. Over the years, the plaster has become blotchy from water seeping through the walls. It is still firmly attached and not powdery, but I want to paint over it and achieve a smooth finish. What is the best way to seal the plaster before painting?Continue

Tags: sealing, plaster, paint

Started by Janice Clark in Old Houses: 1900-1945. Last reply by Randy Klepinger on Wednesday.

First Home Cape Cod 3 Replies

I bought my first home not long ago, and I have been wondering about the age of my home. One known detail is that my property was owned originally by the family that our community was named after. Some opinions of its age would be helpful, the deed dates back to a couple in 1906 the land was gave to them by family & they passed away and the property was transferred again in the 50's. The deeds never mention the structure, however most of the home I believe is built from a type of Pine…Continue

Started by Brad H in Old Houses: 1900-1945. Last reply by Brad H on Wednesday.

Do you live in a George F. Barber "pattern book" house? 100 Replies

I am researching the work on noted "pattern book" architect, George F. Barber. Barber is credited with the creation of tens of thousands of homes, throughout the USA and Canada, by using a mail-order process that stemmed from Barber's pattern books and monthly periodical publications. Barber's designs were published between 1888 and 1908, with the first 12 or so years being largely designed in the Queen Anne Victorian style. Around 1900 Barber reluctantly began to incorporate designs in the…Continue

Tags: pattern book, Queen Anne, George Barber, Victorian

Started by Chris DiMattei in Old Houses: Pre-1900. Last reply by Tammi Frazier on Wednesday.

wood epoxy 7 Replies

I am looking for recommendations for wood epoxy. I have windowsills that are deteriorating from sun with grooves. they are not rotten. I want to fill in the grooves and smooth the surface. Any recommendations?Thanks JeffContinue

Started by Jeff & Sue Ellen Smith in Old-House Products. Last reply by Randy Klepinger on Wednesday.

Blog Posts

Arts & Crafts or Coastal Style?

Our new lakefront cottage has a vintage look and I am trying to decide if an Arts & Crafts look or a Coastal look is more appropriate. I think an Arts & Crafts look is tougher to pull off but I really respect and admire that style. A coastal look may be more suitable to something that is lakefront and is easier with all that wicker and white paint.  Any thoughts? I have attached a picture of the front. …

Continue

Posted by Terry Spencer on October 15, 2012 at 11:13am — 8 Comments

Cheap Winter Window Fix

I have turn of the early 1900's "replacement" windows and good old aluminum storms.  Drinking straws make wonderful, easily removed gaskets.  They even fit in the storm window bottoms.  When I close a window, its tight! 

Posted by lyn joy on October 1, 2012 at 8:45am — 3 Comments

Imminent Teardown of an Historic Home

 

Yet another of New England’s early saltbox homes has recently been condemned to teardown in the name of commercialism and historically insensitive…

Continue

Posted by John Poole on September 26, 2012 at 1:30am — 6 Comments

House style

Picture%202.pngWhat do you think is the style of my Victorian house?

Most say it is in the Gothic Victorian style due to the arched windows and front double door and the quoins in the corners.

Posted by gary minnick on September 19, 2012 at 5:00pm — 4 Comments

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