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I plan to remove the K style gutter from my house for exterior painting and roof work. Once these projects are complete I will put up new gutters. I am not a big fan of the modern troughs and they fit poorly around the moulding on the fascia. I was poking around looking for another solution such as chains or half rounds and came across a product called Rainhandler which claims to redistribute the water back into drops and push it away from the house by a few feet. I have one area of the basement that has water but it is due to a grading issue that will be fixed in the future.

 

Has anyone installed this system, if so how does it work and would you go back to a traditional K style?

http://www.rainhandler.com/

 

 

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Not sure if this is just a veiled ad, but I have seen these advertised in OHJ too and was wondering if they actually worked.  My house's gutters on the tall portion are SO high and dangerous that I have to hire people just to clean them out.  Anybody have these rainhandler things installed on their house, and are you happy with them?

Andy,

 

I can assure you this is not an ad for gutters of any kind. I found this product in OHJ as well and thought others may have tested it out. The biggest problem I am having is keeping the crown molding, trim and rake details on the house and having a gutter system that won't block the work I'm putting into restoring the fascia to waste. I have looked into half rounds and other systems but those all require gutter hangers nailed through my new roof. The last thing I want is to put more holes than I need to through 50 year architectural shingles that will be going on in the next few weeks.

 

 

Whoa there!

" I have looked into half rounds and other systems but those all require gutter hangers nailed through my new roof. The last thing I want is to put more holes than I need to through 50 year architectural shingles that will be going on in the next few weeks."

Half round gutter hangers are never supposed to be nailed through the roof shingles. They go under the shingles and are nailed to the roof rafters. Put the hangers on first, then the roof, and then finish the gutter.

Yes, never allow gutter hangers to be face nailed through your shingles.  For post-roofing guttering, I think that there may be some different types of hangers available.

At $3/ft how does that compare to regular gutter. We live in New Mexico, and water catchment is almost required, so one has to have a gutter system. We are renovating, and gutter is another thing we have to do.

I can't imagine anything costing $3 a foot.  Copper 1/2 round, for example, costs $10 a foot for the guttering, not including the hangers, downspouts (I had to use 50' for 70' linear feet of guttering), corners, and  labor to put it up and solder the joints.  Think $40 or $50 per linear foot when all is said and done.  Maybe you save 1/3 off of that to go with galvanized 1/2 round, but then you have to paint it inside and out.  Regardless, always have your 1/2 round soldered at the joints.  Otherwise, you will have to constantly be rescrewing it up after snows and recaulking the unsoldered joints.  Even worse if you use aluminum.  Trust me, and I speak from experience, that is discouraging. 

Phil,

Been out of touch on gutter, and now have to consider it. The house had one working built-in gutter. I say working as it could have been if it had not rotted out the wood. All the others were roofed over at some point. We just repaired the rotted wood and roofed over the last gutter. Still have the downsspout installed

 

So now what to do. Living in NM we have to catch the rain, if you want water for your plants, so gutter is essential. The built-in gutter I mentioned above was only located to catch the four valleys in each corner of the house. This was probably 75% of all the runoff anyway.

The amount of gutter required is not very much. As I said, the roof lines focus the runoff pretty much to the four corners, so I think we could look at putting something up that looks good and fits the age of the house.

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