Time to replace front porch deck: fir vs mahogany T&G?

It is the same price at the local yard.  I am replacing a yellow pine floor of 15 years that did not hold paint well and has had a lot of rot problems.  Thoughts? 

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I am trying to figure out why I have replaced flooring 100 years old and it seems in fair shape.  The new boards put in are rotted in 5 - 10 years.  Have they changed the trees or are they just not making them like they used to.  If the pine didn't work out try something else. Replacing this stuff is just too much work every few years..  

I had the same issue when I was trying to renovate my old house in Auckland. At that time I found design and build SO Renovate company in my area and their specialists helped me to finish all work in the best possible way. I think in such cases is better to consult with the local professionals first.

The new floor is now on (went with the mahogany), treated with linseed oil and in the middle of coats of marine varnish.

The final outcome on this was excellent.  

I need to do this for my porch, too! My porch's floorboards look like this but a hundred years old and bug-eaten in places.

How much did this end up costing you, and for how many square feet? How long did it take? Is this something a layperson could do with little to know carpentry knowledge, or would you recommend hiring a professional?

It was bundled in with another project, both completed by the same professional.  Maybe 7 or 8 dollars per square foot for the wood and about that same amount for the installation, Letonkinois Linseed varnish and labor.  He treated all sides of each board with heated linseed oil as part of it. Getting boards tight enough but not too tight takes carpentry experience: too loose and it invites water to seep in and sit on the tongues, leading to rot, while too tight will risk the boards cupping when humidity is high.

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