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Phil
  • Male
  • Williamsport, PA
  • United States
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Phil's Discussions

A beautiful chandelier

Started Jan 25, 2015

Has anyone used a bathroom exhaust fan in a kitchen?
3 Replies

Started this discussion. Last reply by Phil Jul 7, 2014.

 

Phil's Page

Latest Activity

Phil replied to M Mccully's discussion What type of house is this?
"I think that this has the feel of a simple tudor style.  Side entrance says bungalow.  So maybe a Tudor bungalow.  If it was put on some sort of registry in 1985, however, it would have had to have documentation supplied at that time.…"
Saturday
Phil replied to Phil's discussion Best wood for uncovered porch steps?
"I have a friend with a large stash of air-dried boards that he cut with a portable sawmill.  He sold me some 9/4" black walnut boards (those are thick!) that have held up well.  All parts the stairs and railings were brushed with wood…"
Friday
Chris Spielmann replied to Phil's discussion Best wood for uncovered porch steps?
"Hi Phil/John, So now it's 2016 and I have the same problem, uncovered wood exterior steps that are very hard to keep in good shape. My newel posts and railing are Spanish cedar painted with Fine Paints and hold up very well, but the stair…"
Friday
Phil replied to Jeremy 's discussion Help figuring out architectural style
"Are those bullseye blocks in the corners of the window frames?"
Jul 14
Phil replied to Jeremy 's discussion Help figuring out architectural style
"Very unusual, and definitely not a standard style.  Do you have pictures of interior details, such as doorknobs, hinges, doors, or other original details?"
Jul 13
Phil replied to Stephanie's discussion Front Door Help
"There are a lot of possiblities.  I think that a lot of houses of that era had double front doors, for example.  I think that I would start by finding neighboring or regional houses of similar size and style to see what they have as a…"
Jul 8
Phil replied to AnnaP's discussion Searching for a milk chute
"They are around.  I just typed: milk door into an ebay search box, got 196 mostly unrelated hits, but there were 2 pretty nice (and very overpriced at $895) majestic brand cast doors, and one cheaper ($50) less fancy doors.  The expensive…"
Jul 7
Phil replied to Cat Wood's discussion Is this a Victorian light fitting or not?
"Not a bad idea--but make sure that you get a real Victorian light, as a real 1920s light is more cool than a repro gas light.  Late victorian gas lighting was typically brass, as opposed to the cast fixtures of the aesthetic lighting that…"
Jun 29

Profile Information

Tell us about yourself:
My family has lived in a c. 1895 Queen Anne Victorian since 1995. I am an economist.
Tell us about your old-house experiences and dreams:
Over the years I have slowly learned about how it was built and how to maintain it, as well as how not to maintain it. Whenever possible, I try to use original materials or ones that could have been used originally, or at the very least ones that look like those materials.

My house had many original elements, and I have maintained or restored most of those. Other things like lighting and doorknobs had been "upgraded" over time, so I spent the better part of 10 years haunting antique shops and ebay to find replacements that matched the style and level of my house. In the case of lighting, we have only one original gas fixture in our entry. I have tried to purchase a restrained level of gas lighting for the rest of the house, avoiding the temptation of lighting that would have been too fancy for my nice, but ultimately middle class Victorian. Lighting of that type is surprisingly cheap (much cheaper than repro), and I enjoyed collecting them.

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Phil's Blog

Slate countertops

The slate countertops are almost in now.  Our contractors drove to the quarry (Penn Big Bed Slate Co) to get the pieces that they had ordered for our three counters that we are doing in slate.  It looks a medium dark gray from the quarry.  After they cut it to exact size and installed it, they rubbed it with mineral oil to seal it, and that darkened it to a near black color.  The picture with the sink in it is still in process and without the mineral oil, while the other ones have…

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Posted on July 8, 2014 at 12:22am

Kitchen exhaust system

We have never had an exhaust fan in our kitchen and were getting tired of the smoke alarm going off every time we broail or fry things.  But we have an exposed chimney behind our range that we did not want to add a hood to.  So, we decided to put a flush mount system in.  Our contractors opened up the brick into one of the flues,and installed a metal exhaust pipe in that. On ebay we bought a round cast iron register in the same pattern as our kitchen forced air register, and then they…

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Posted on July 8, 2014 at 12:11am

Cabinet latches, salvaged cast iron

Posted on June 7, 2014 at 10:17am

Progress on the kitchen.

Posted on May 30, 2014 at 1:26pm

Comment Wall (27 comments)

At 9:13am on September 15, 2008, Eden said…
Hey Phil

I only have access to email on weekdays, so am just getting back to you. I bought my home in 1999 and after striping paint off a front porch column and woodwork in the kitchen, I found stamped in ink, NTY Wm. H, Shugars, Gordon VanTine, plus the backs of the basment steps had blue #s handwritten on them. Shugars was the original owner on my deed, 1912.

While searching for information, I asked folks on another forum if they knew of this company. Lucky for me, the GVT expert saw my quest that day and asked for a picture of my home. He ID'd it from GVT's Book of Plans, 1912-1915/1916, House Plan #122. This company was a competitor of Sears. He sent me a copy of that book of plans and a black and white photo to hang in my foyer, I think I paid him $10. A plan house differs from a kit house whereby it"s the same house you would buy as a kit but the carpenter would cut the lumber from the plan house blueprints< thus saving money There are many companies that sold these kit and plan homes darn computer will not let me type comma and periods so I will send this now
At 11:13pm on September 16, 2008, Demetra said…
I'm with you Phil. That roof should be slate, in a rich array of variegated colors...
At 8:21am on November 11, 2008, Susan Scofield said…
I should have done re-wiring a little at a time. I wasted $4,000 last summer on a guy that did not do the things I requested and did a bunch of things that I did not need. I still have wiring that needs to be completed even though I paid for things I was told I had. Live and learn. Thank you, Phil for the input.
At 8:57pm on November 21, 2008, Susan Scofield said…
The roof on the tower is copper. The seams stand up about 1/2 inch and are crimped together. I am not sure what you call the seam design. The roof is original to the house. As for dating the house I have found that the couple that built it bought the lot in 1896, and the sewer line was connected to the city sewer system in March, 1903. I have discovered a newspaper article in our local library that showed pictures of the forest that was leveled and cleared for my street. The same article stated that the houses were built, the walls plastered, and the plaster left to cure for twelve months with no windows in the houses. When the plaster had "seasoned' the windows and woodwork were installed and the houses were finished. I have uncovered signatures in pencil under the old siding on the sheathing boards.
At 4:57am on December 7, 2008, Morgan Campbell said…
Thank you for the comment Phil. I am very new to this sort of "online community" so am slow. My home reads Vancouver Edwardian/craftsman builder (very humble) and I am searching through my photos to find one to add online. Your home is beautiful! It is unusual in its combination of styles - the gambrel roof, tower, Eastlake elements - this old house passion is exciting!

See you online,
Morgan
At 3:45pm on December 20, 2008, Jane Powell said…
Thanks, Phil. Glad you liked the article. My favorite built-in in my own house is a bench in the upstairs hall which opens to reveal the laundry chute. And all my built-ins have fake pegged thru-tenons, which amuses me no end.

Since it's been cold here the last few days (in California that means 50 degrees- that's Spring in places with real weather!), I've been in the attic rolling out more insulation. It has to be that cold outside in order to go up there for any length of time, since there's absolutely no ventilation.
At 10:37am on February 2, 2009, Craig Phillips / B & C Emporium said…
Hi Phil, Welcome to the Jewlery of the Antique homes goup,
Craig Phillips
B & C Emporium
At 3:38pm on March 6, 2009, John (OldHouseTours.com) said…
I have video of the house with the tower that I will be putting online probably next week. Stay tuned. I will be launching a new site with it.
At 7:01pm on March 10, 2009, Swede said…
My building is in "downtown" Lindsborg. I've driven through Newton. Good looking town with nice hospital.
At 3:33pm on March 31, 2009, Sarah said…
Phil - your house is gorgeous! I love the exterior color scheme - and kudos for doing the slate roof. We have a slate roof in the building where I work, and it unloads snow like crazy - no ice dams! Thanks for your kind comments about our kitchen.

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